Beans and Legumes

Chorizo and Black Bean Queso

by Shawnda on October 6, 2014

in Appetizers,Beans and Legumes,Mexican & TexMex,Pork,Tailgating Favorites

Chorizo and Black Bean Queso

Last weekend, we had the most amazingly glorious cool front blow through southeast Texas that left me so ready for sweatshirts and frito pie and Friday night football games.

We don’t usually get very much of (what most people consider) a fall, but the snippets we do get are to be immediately celebrated with early morning runs, crockpots full of chili, and publicly sporting a scarf and riding boots. Even though we all know that chilly morning low of 60 will quickly climb to 81 by lunch.

IT STILL COUNTS.

Chorizo and Black Bean Queso

With windows open and Pandora blasting a carefully crafted no-BroCountry-allowed station, we set out to make football munchies for the don’t-even-think-about-turning-on-the-AC weekend.

We started with melted cheese. And a shot of tequila.

Chorizo and Black Bean Queso

We cook up some Chorizo (mexican pork sausage) and then deglaze the pan with tequila to get the flavors from all those browned bits of wonderful into the dip.

Someone onions, cheese, a can of black beans later, and a bowl of pico de gallo later, we’re ready for action. (And by “action,” I mean sitting on the couch in front of football.)

Chorizo and Black Bean Queso

Serve it in any one of these approved, tried-and-true methods: with chips, straight from a bowl. Make a big pan of nachos and graze all day while screaming Mommy words at the TV. Grab a stack of tortillas and wrap up a scoop of the leftovers with scrambled eggs the next morning.

Your call. You win.

Nachos with Chorizo and Black Bean Queso

Chile con queso spiked with tequila, black beans, and chorizo sausage.

Ingredients

  • For the queso:
  • 12 oz Chorizo sausage, removed from casing and crumbled
  • 1 1/2 oz (3 Tbsp) tequila
  • 1/2 small red onion
  • 1/2-3/4 cup milk
  • 12 oz white American cheese, shredded
  • 4 oz Monterrey Jack cheese, shredded
  • 1 can black beans, rinsed and drained
  • For the nachos:
  • Tortilla chips
  • 1/2 pint grape tomatoes, diced
  • 2 jalapenos, sliced
  • Small handful of cilantro, chopped
  • Juice from half a lime
  • Salt

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 375.
  2. In a sauce pan over medium-high, brown the sausage thoroughly.
  3. Transfer the cooked sausage to a strainer (I also quickly ran the strainer under hot water to remove extra fat - sacrilegious but seriously, there's so much fat!) and remove as much of the grease from the pan as possible without scraping off any of the browned bits from the pan.
  4. Add tequila and red onions to the pan and return it to the cooktop, stirring and scraping the browned bits from the pan.
  5. When the liquid has evaporated, add 1/2 cup milk and the shredded cheese.
  6. Reduce heat to medium-low and stir frequently to help melting along. Add cooked chorizo, beans, and additional milk if, after melted, it still seems too thick.
  7. Place tortilla chips on a baking sheet.
  8. Pour the queso over the chips (I saved a few spoonfuls for breakfast tacos) and pop into the oven for 10 minutes.
  9. Mix the tomatoes, jalapenos, cilantro, lime juice, and a pinch of salt in a small bowl. Spoon over the nachos fresh from the oven.
  10. Serve hot or warm.

Notes

Yields: Servings vary

Source: Confections of a Foodie Bride

Estimated time: 20 minutes

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Hatch Chile Borracho Beans

The onset of hatch chile season means that the pot of beans I make for the 2-3 TexMex nights that are always on the menu get a green chile makeover.

Hatch Chile Borracho Beans

Where I come from, you usually have three options for beans on taco night: refried beans, charro beans, and borracho beans.

Refried beans are easy, especially when your two-ingredient recipe calls for a can opener and a can. Charro beans take a little bit of planning and a whole lot of bacon.

Borracho beans? They also need a little bit of planning. But most of all? They need beer.

Hatch Chile Borracho Beans

In addition to being spiked with beer, these beans are also spiked with green chile salsa verde and a hatch chile pico de gallo.

Hatch Chile Borracho Beans

Here in Texas, Shiner has always been the popular choice for borracho beans. There are very few rules, but there is one thing to remember: Pick out an amber-or-darker brew from your fridge because, just like in all other aspects of real life, light beer won’t do much for you.

Hatch Chile Borracho Beans

Your favorite taco night side infused with green chiles and beer.

Ingredients

  • For the beans:
  • 1 lb dry pinto beans, rinsed and soaked*
  • 12 oz beer (medium/amber is best; I used a locally brewed jalapeno ale this time)
  • 2 Tbsp brown sugar
  • 1/2 small red onion
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 tsp salt
  • Black pepper
  • 1 tsp chile powder (I used a New Mexican blend)
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/2 cup green chile salsa verde
  • For the hatch chile pico de gallo:
  • 3 large roma tomatoes, seeded and diced
  • 1/2 small red onion, diced
  • 2 hatch chiles roasted, seeded, and chopped*
  • Juice of 1/2 lime
  • Small handful of cilantro, chopped
  • *Either soak overnight or do the quick-soak method: bring beans to a boil, turn off heat, and let stand 1 hour; drain and proceed with recipe.

Instructions

  1. Place the pre-soaked beans, beer, brown sugar, onion, garlic, salt, pepper, chile powder, cumin, and salsa verde in a large pot.
  2. Cover with 3-4 inches of water and bring to a boil.
  3. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook with the lid ajar for ~90 minutes, until the beans are tender.
  4. Mix the ingredients for the pico de gallo and add half of the mixture to the beans.
  5. Cover and let stand for 15 minutes; stir and adjust seasoning as desired.
  6. Serve beans garnished with the remaining pico de gallo.

Notes

Yields: 8-10 servings

Source: Confections of a Foodie Bride

Estimated time: 3 hours

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Black & White Tacos

There’s bar food. And then there’s post-bar food. Those tacos, those fell into the latter category.

After college, I predictably kept the safety-net low-paying, entry-level job as a drone at SkyNet that I used to pay my some of my way through school to work for a bunch of people who undervalued me only slightly more than I undervalued myself. I was quiet, reserved. I did what I was told, showed up when I was supposed to, and somehow managed to fill out a weekly to-do list with the fluffiest of fluff – always leaving off the biggest accomplishment of the week. Smothering another section of my soul.

Black & White Tacos

I missed the smell of old books and desperation while cramming in the library before a Histology or Virology exam. I missed the crazy, passionate look in Professor Ds eyes as she lectured on the physiology of the nasal passages of dessert mice and urinary tracts of frogs. (And really, how awesome is a person who can get excited over frog kidneys?)

I missed the quiet. I missed dreaming about the future, what I was going to be when I “grew up.” Being an adult sucked. And the second the clock on my very-closely-monitored-as-if-I-were-a-criminal PC clicked over to 5:00pm, I was running out the door to the half of an apartment I shared with the anti-Shawnda in a transitional area of town that was half pouring-distance-to-great-night-life and half lock-yourself-in-after-dark.

You had to prioritize.

Black & White Tacos

Anti-Shawnda & I had tons in common: we both could afford only half of the rent and we both drove Dodge Rams. (And sweet Jesus, are Texas boys seriously weak when it comes to the whole girls-who-drive-trucks thing.) (And we totally knew it.)

Most weekends, she felt it was her mission in life to liberate me from the spinster-in-training delivery Star pizza and a game of Madden to bounce between douchey clubs full of douchey poeple, all vying for the chance to pour another round at the drop-dead-gorgeous brunette, and by association, the blonde bored-as-hell-and-kinda-bitchy-and-angry-at-the-world friend (as many a wingman would describe) next to her. Rule #1: Guys who didn’t want to – or worse, couldn’t - talk football with a girl didn’t get to talk about anything else with the girl.

More than once I went to the bathroom with the intention of hopping into a cab cab to drive me back home after making a pitstop at Chacho’s.

Black & White Tacos

Now that was truly worthy of putting on pants and eyeliner after 8pm. Chacho’s was where the real party was. A few texts and a cab ride later, a few fellow spinsters-in-training and I would converge to celebrate escaping another wingman who had no respect for personal space with tortillas so fluffy and thick, you’d be hard-pressed to pass them off as tortillas.

Call ‘em what you want, but they served as the perfect vehicle to The Black & White: a burrito loaded with black beans, white cheese, sour cream, and then the predictable burrito white noise of shredded lettuce and tomatoes.

You ordered it as a half or you had them cut a whole one to split with a spinster-in-training. Like the Texas Teas at the Marquis II, you didn’t tackle a whole one by yourself and remember enough about it to be able to brag the next day. But those Tuesday half-price teas are a story for another day.

Today the story is a decently fulfilled, happy-with-life, still-LOVES-to-talk-football, non-spinster blonde whipping up a more manageable version of the black & white for her husband and daughter.

Black & White Tacos

Black beans, Monterrey jack cheese, and sour cream (or Greek yogurt) make for a fantastic meatless taco worthy of reminiscing about the old days.

Ingredients

  • Black beans (you can used rinsed canned beans or use these leftovers)
  • Flour tortillas
  • Grated Monterrey Jack cheese
  • Sour Cream (I use 2% Total Fage Yogurt)
  • Pico de gallo
  • Lime wedges
  • Sliced jalapenos

Instructions

  1. Top warmed tortillas with 1/4 cup of black beans, a generous pinch of cheese, pico, sliced jalapenos.
  2. Squeeze a lime wedge over top before dolloping yogurt/sour cream and rolling.
  3. Happily reminisce about the old days.*
  4. *Your experience may vary.

Notes

Yields: Servings vary

Source: Confections of a Foodie Bride, Inspired by Chacho's

Estimated time: 20 minutes

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Black Beans with Hatch Chiles, Chicken Sausage, and Quinoa

I was just not cut out to be a hoarder. I try – like really try – but in the end, neurosis kicks in and my priorities immediately shift to depleting the mountain of whatever I just bought “because it was such a great deal!” as quickly as humanly possible.

Obtaining things – not hard. But REtaining them? Completely impossible. Except toothpaste. Good Lord, do you know how long 12 tubes last?!

I had nearly 20lbs of hatch chiles in the freezer at one point. Now? Not even close. Why buy 20 lbs in August when I know I can get them canned year-round? Maybe because for a few short weeks, I happily submit to the hype and convince myself that it’s not quite the same making Pepperoni & Hatch Pizza in September with fresh chiles as it is in April with canned chiles… but we’re all adults here and we know it’s close enough that it won’t matter.

{Also, the little Fage Total yogurts were BOGO this week! Guess who has 18 now 15 containers of Greek yogurt in her fridge? And guess who eats like 2 a day?}

{Also, Target has Clif bars 6/$5 this week! Guess who will never have to buy another Clif bar again?}

So Mission:Empty The Freezer of All Signs of Hatch Chiles continues with this week’s favorite dinner to loudly protest and pout about before even taking a single bite: beans, sausage, and rice.

Black Beans with Hatch Chiles, Chicken Sausage, and Quinoa

Why’d you type it like that – “beans, sausage, and rice.” You always say “red beans & rice.” Sausage is a given. And you didn’t say “red.” Why are you being so vague? WHAT ARE YOU EVEN DOING OVER THERE?!

Simmah down, na’! Your red beans are actually black and loaded with hatch chiles. The sausage is made out of chicken and stuffed with cheese and hatch chiles. And no, the rice isn’t really rice. It’s quinoa.

Man, you just can’t slip anything by anybody over GChat in this house :)

Black Beans with Hatch Chiles, Chicken Sausage, and Quinoa

I took a page out of my mom’s playbook (probably called Live Free and Crock Hard) (God, I hope that doesn’t means something gross in Urban Dictionary) (I’m totally not looking – and don’t you dare tell me if you do!) and made a giant vat of beans in the crockpot so I’d have lunchable leftovers for the week in the form of Black & White tacos.

If you’re going stove top method for the beans, you’ll need to decide if you’re going to overnight soak or quick soak (check your pack of dried beans for instructions). If you’re going canned, your house won’t smell awesome all day long… but you also won’t have to run the dishwasher a second time to avoid handwashing the crock.

But seriously, go make this and put a dent in your hatch chile stash. You can’t mess it up, whatever route you take.

Black Beans with Hatch Chiles, Chicken Sausage, and Quinoa

Chicken sausage, quinoa, black beans, and hatch chiles make for a healthier - and spicier - twist on beans & rice.

Ingredients

  • For the beans
  • 1 lb dried black beans
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1/2 medium white onion, diced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 slices of thick bacon, diced
  • Salt
  • 6 hatch chiles, roasted, seeded, and chopped (directions here)
  • 1 lb sausage, cut into ~1/3-inch rounds*
  • 3 cups cooked rice or quinoa (1/2 cup per person)
  • *I used HEB Hatch Chile & Cheese Chicken Sausage; it wasn't precooked so I just cooked it separately.

Instructions

  1. Put rinsed and picked-over dried beans in the crockpot with 8 cups of water, bay leaves, onion, garlic, bacon, and a couple of generous pinches of salt.
  2. Cook on low for 8 hours.
  3. Add the chiles and sausage to the crockpot and let stand on low to heat the meat through, ~20 minutes.
  4. Serve a generous scoop of beans & sausage over 1/2 cup of cooked rice or quinoa.

Notes

Yields: 6 servings, with leftover beans

Source: Confections of a Foodie Bride

Estimated time: 8 hours

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