Condiments

Grapefruit Marmalade

by Shawnda on February 23, 2012

in Condiments,Fruit

Ruby Red Grapefruit Marmalade

Happiness comes in a jar.

I’ll also concede that it often comes in a corked bottle. And a salt-rimmed glass. But for today, it’s jarred.

Last Christmas, my Secret Santa Megan sent me a jar of her homemade Pink Grapefruit Marmalade in my squee-inducing box of goodies. And it was gone in no-time (as was the tomatillo jelly). Never underestimate the power of a tablespoon of citrusy marmalade when combined with a warm biscuit!

After scraping the jar so clean that I could have put it straight into the cabinet, I set out to make a batch of my own with my favorite Rio Star grapefruit. I found Nigella Lawson’s low-maintenance method on ChowHound and really liked the idea of being able to throw a bunch of fruit in the pot and catching up on DVRed Revenge and Supernatural. And Alcatraz.

And Big Bang Theory. We have a small-ish TV problem in this house.

The first batch I made was pretty bitter – even for a grapefruit addict like myself – so I only included the peel from half of the grapefruit in the second batch – it was much more balanced. I also didn’t have enough sugar the second time so I supplemented it by scraping the very last drop of honey out of that little plastic bear (lazy shopping week… they happen… a lot). Excellent decision. The marmalade is sweet, has the slight hint of honey, and finishes with that wonderful grapefruit bitterness.

Ruby Red Grapefruit Marmalade

Ruby Red Grapefruit Marmalade

A beautifully balanced grapefruit marmalade with a slight hint of honey.

Ingredients

  • 2 large ruby red grapefruit, about 1 1/2 lbs (Texas grapefruit, if possible)
  • 2 1/2 cups sugar
  • 1/2 cup honey (or more sugar)
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 1-2 drops red gel food coloring (optional)
  • Pinch of salt

Instructions

  1. Wash and quarter the grapefruit, removing any large seeds.
  2. Place in a 3-4 qt pot and cover with just enough water to make the grapefruit float.
  3. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat and simmer for 2 hours, adding additional water occasionally to keep the grapefruit from resting on the bottom of the pot.
  4. Remove from heat, drain, and let the grapefruit wedges cool.
  5. Transfer 1/2 of the grapefruit wedges to the bowl of a food processor.
  6. Use a spoon to scrape the flesh from the remaining 4 wedges into the food processor bowl, leaving the membranes and pith behind. Discard unused grapefruit peels.
  7. Process for 10-15 seconds, until there aren't any large pieces of grapefruit peel left (I tried to keep the chunks smaller than a dime).
  8. Return the mixture to the pot and add the sugar, honey (if using), salt, and lemon juice.
  9. Heat over medium heat, stirring until sugar has dissolved.
  10. Bring to a boil and let cook 15-20 minutes. The marmalade is done when a small teaspoonful is placed on the cold plate and it forms a skin within 1-2 minutes that wrinkles when you lightly tough it.
  11. Stir in 1-2 drops of gel food coloring, if using.
  12. Remove from heat and ladle into prepared jars.
  13. You can either process the jars in a water bath or just store them in the fridge if you plan to use them as quickly as I do (that's why I made such a small batch).

Notes

Yields: 1 1/2 pints (48 1-Tbsp servings)

Adapted from How to Be a Domestic Goddess

Estimated time: 3 hours

Nutritional Information
Calories: 56.7 | Fat: 0g | Fiber .2g | Protein .1g | Carbs 14.8g
Weight Watchers PointsPlus: 2

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Blood Orange Curd

by Shawnda on February 10, 2012

in Blood orange,Condiments,Lighter & Healthier

Blood Orange Curd

When you whisk together a simple mixture of butter, eggs, sugar, lemon, and blood orange juices, what you get is a beautiful pink shade of spreadable happiness.

And a stained white shirt.

With the number of aprons I own, there’s really no excuse for that.

We’ve whipped up a couple of batches of blood orange curd in the last month, tempted by the availability and price of blood oranges recently. There are few baked goods that aren’t made better with a dollop of a citrusy curd. Use it to spread on scones, served aside slices of angel food cake, or fill a batch of ordinary white cupcakes with it and watch your guests go crazy over them.

I used the same versatile recipe that I used to make grapefruit curd. And just like the grapefruit, this one won’t thicken with blood orange juice alone – the acidity from lemon juice is required to get that perfectly spreadable texture.

Blood Orange Curd

The color of your curd is going to vary, depending on how dark the blood orange juice is from your fruit. The first batch I made was more of warm pink/salmon color. This batch was a very dark pink, almost to the point of looking like melted strawberry ice cream. Both were equally delicious :)

Blood Orange Curd

Blood orange and lemon juices combine to make a beautiful pink citrus curd.

Ingredients

  • 2 eggs
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 Tbsp blood orange zest (from 1 orange)
  • 6 Tbsp blood orange juice (from 1 orange)
  • 2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1/2 cup butter, cut into 4 pieces

Instructions

  1. Whisk the zest, juices, sugar, and eggs in a bowl set over a saucepan of simmering water. Add butter and whisk constantly, until thickened and smooth (a thermometer should read 165-170F).
  2. Strain curd through a fine sieve set over another bowl. Serve warm or cover surface of curd with wax paper and cool completely.
  3. Curd will keep 7-10 days in the fridge covered.

Notes

Yields: 1 1/2 cups (or 12 2-Tbsp servings)

Adapted from Meyer Lemon Curd

Estimated time: 20 minutes

Nutritional Information
Calories: 104.8 | Fat: 8.5g | Fiber 0g | Protein 1.2g | Carbs 6.5g
Weight Watchers PointsPlus: 3

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Homemade Jalapeno Pepper Jelly

I have a knack for loving things that seem to quickly go out of style. Or TV shows that get canceled (I’m looking at you, Jericho and Flash Forward). But some things are just way too awesome to ever go out of style. Like yoga pants, cupcakes (not the $4 boutique variety, but in general), putting bacon in and on everything, and jalapeno pepper jelly.

Pepper jellies used to be all the rage, making appearances along side a block of cream cheese and a bowl of crackers, at every single party I attended in 2004 and 2005. But then it just kind of disappeared. Sweet and spicy, it paired wonderfully with tangy cream cheese and a salty, buttery cracker. I could go on and on, but I’m going to quickly run out of adjectives.

Homemade Jalapeno Pepper Jelly

This year, we’re including a jar of red and green jalapeno pepper jelly in our gift baskets. Because we’re still harvesting 50+ jalapeno and serrano peppers a week from our garden. In December. I’m a complete novice when it comes to canning – I can make freezer jam like it’s nobody’s business and turn out a batch of candied jalapenos in no time, but more advanced things make me a little twitchy. But there’s no twitchiness involved here because this recipe is that easy.

For this batch, I used all red jalapenos and serranos – when you put off harvesting them, they actually turn a beautiful bright red! I also think that’s when they go from being “just” a spicy pepper to a seventh-circle-of-hell-hot pepper.

Red Jalapeno Pepper Jelly

Sweet and spicy red pepper jelly, serve it with cream cheese and crackers. Make a festive green jalapeno pepper jelly by using green peppers and adding a few drops of green food coloring at the end of the cooking time.

Ingredients

  • 1 orange bell pepper, halved and seeds and stem removed
  • 1 lb red jalapeno peppers, seeds and stems removed (for a spicy jelly, use a couple of serranos and leave in the seeds to half/all of the peppers)
  • 1 1/2 cups cider vinegar
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 6 cups sugar
  • 3 oz liquid pectin
  • 1 Tbsp butter

Instructions

  1. Put the peppers into a food processor and process for 7-10 seconds. Alternately, you can finely chop them by hand - wear gloves!
  2. Transfer the peppers to a large pot and add the vinegar.
  3. Bring to a boil and then let simmer for 15 to 20 minutes.
  4. Pour through a fine mesh sieve to separate the peppers from the liquid, you should have 1 cup of liquid. Simmer longer to reduce, if necessary.
  5. Return the liquid and as much of the pulp/seeds (more for a much spicier jam, less/none for a slightly spicy jelly) to the pot and add the salt and sugar until dissolved.
  6. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat.
  7. When the mixture comes to a rolling boil (one that cannot be stirred down), boil for one minute, and then add the butter.
  8. Stir the butter into the mixture and then add the liquid pectin, stirring to mix.
  9. Let boil for 3 minutes.
  10. Ladle into sterile jars leaving 1/4 inch headspace.
  11. To store jars at room temperature, you'll need to seal them in a hot water bath for 10 minutes. Otherwise, let the jars come to room temperature, place the lids on them, and then store them in the fridge (the jelly will keep a couple of months this way).
  12. Refrigerate jelly after seal is broken.

Notes

Yields: ~6 8 oz jars

Adapted from AllRecipes and Ball

Estimated time: 1 hour

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Grapefruit Curd

by Shawnda on November 29, 2011

in Citrus,Condiments,Grapefruit

Grapefruit Curd

For me, grapefruit has been an acquired taste. My mom frequently ate half a grapefruit sprinkled with sugar for breakfast. And I frequently scoffed at her “old people food.” Food that she’d probably throw at me if she ever heard me refer to her as old :)

Now that I’m… older, I’ve grown to appreciate the fruit in many forms: broiled, margarita form, cookie form, and cake form. But let’s be honest – mostly in margarita form.

An absolutely delicious way to use up half a grapefruit is to make grapefruit curd, a smooth, citrusy, and tart concoction that you can smear over angel food cake, toast, biscuits, or scones. It makes a great cake filling, too.

Grapefruit juice alone isn’t acidic enough to thicken into the creamy deliciousness that you know as a citrus curd so you have to add a little lemon juice. A fact I discovered years ago before finding this recipe, after wasting 8 egg yolks and 2 sticks of butter in a mixture that just wouldn’t thicken.

The color of your curd will depend on the color of your grapefruit. This batch was a very pale, orangey yellow. A previous batch was from a beautiful ruby Texas Rio Star grapefruit and it was a pinkish, salmon color.

Grapefruit Curd

A smooth, citrusy, and tart concoction that you can smear over angel food cake, toast, or scones.

Ingredients

  • 2 eggs
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 1 Tbsp grapefruit zest (about 1/2 a large grapefruit)
  • 6 Tbsp grapefruit juice (about 1/2 a large grapefruit)
  • 2 Tbsp lemon juice
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 stick of butter, cut into 4 pieces

Instructions

  1. Whisk the zest, juices, sugar, and eggs in a bowl set over a saucepan of simmering water. Add butter and whisk constantly, until thickened and smooth (a thermometer should read 160-170F).
  2. Strain curd through a fine sieve set over another bowl. Serve warm or cover surface of curd with wax paper and cool completely.
  3. Curd will keep a week in the fridge covered.

Notes

Yields: 1 1/2 cups

Adapted from Meyer Lemon Curd

Estimated time: 20 minutes

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